Magazine 14 May 2024

Can cystitis occur even without burning?

My dear friend,

most people tend to associate symptoms such as burning and pain during urination with a urinary tract infection (also known as UTI).

But, alas, this is not always the case, and if you have decided to open this article it means that you too have some doubts about it.

Let us therefore delve deeper together. ❤️

Can you have cystitis without burning? Yes (but you can still learn to recognize this infection)

These are the main causes of cystitis: why is it important to know them?

As I mentioned earlier, there are many people who are convinced that burning or pain during urination is an inevitable consequence of a urinary tract infection (UTI). In fact, many urinary tract infections do not cause pain in urination, and some people are completely asymptomatic.

However, even in the absence of dysuria-that is, difficulty urinating and painful urination- UTIs can be bothersome and even dangerous if left untreated. That is why it is essential to find out the causes, know how to prevent these infections, and know the most accurate diagnosis.

But fear not, today we will address these issues together!

So, urinary tract infections develop when bacteria enter the urinary tract through the urethra and make their way to the bladder, kidneys or other urinary tract structures, precisely developing an infection. Although UTIs are more common in women than in men, anyone at any age can develop a UTI, including cystitis.

Common causes and risk factors include:

Read also: The close link between vulvodynia and cystitis

But let’s cut to the chase: can I have cystitis without experiencing burning?

In principle, yes.

Many patients develop painless UTIs, although most men and women have at least one other common symptom, such as fever, foul-smelling urine, or fatigue.

For this reason, it is even more essential to Learning to recognize the symptoms of a UTI: Although we have said that there are asymptomatic cases, most people who suffer from a urinary tract infection-including cystitis-complain of at least one (or more) of the symptoms I am about to list:

  • Pain during urination;
  • Burning during urination;
  • pelvic pain;
  • Feeling of constant need to urinate;
  • fever;
  • cold chills;
  • nausea or vomiting;
  • fatigue;
  • General feeling of malaise;
  • cloudy urine;
  • Malodorous or strongly smelling urine.

How to treat cystitis (even in the absence of burning)

In addition to the symptoms and signs the patient may have, there are specific tests that can help in diagnosis.

Foremost among them is urinalysis for the presence of blood particles, pus, or bacteria: in some cases a bacterial urine culture may be required. However, if you want to have extra confirmation before the tests at the specialist, you can opt for urine sticks.

Wait, the sticks what? 🤨

These are smears that change color if they detect the presence of bacteria in the urine.

In more severe cases, the specialist may decide to use cystoscopy, x-rays, or ultrasound so as to rule out other causes of bladder inflammation, such as tumors or abnormalities of internal structures.

Specifically, cystoscopy is an examination in which the specialist inserts a cystoscope-a small tube with a light and camera-into the bladder through the urethra to visualize the urinary tract and see signs of cystitis.

That said, how to treat cystitis? Let’s say there are two viable paths.

Bacterial cystitis is treated mainly with antibiotics to stop the infection.

If it is a first infection, symptoms may improve even in the first day of taking antibiotics. However, it is good for the patient to take antibiotics for three days to a week, depending on the severity of the symptoms. In fact, it is important that antibiotic treatment is completed according to the doses recommended by the specialist and that the infection is completely cleared.

If, however, we are talking about recurrent infections, the physician may recommend a longer course of antibiotics or refer the patient to a specialist in urology or nephrology for further evaluation.

Instead, what is the second way forward? 🧐

Many women went in search of a natural solution that would allow them to avoid having to take additional antibiotics, and they found the answer in D-mannose.

What is it?

It is a simple sugar that, when taken correctly, reaches the bladder where the bacteria are, adheres to their fimbriae, and helps expel them in a completely natural way: while you pee!

Specifically, our Dimann brand products derive D-mannose from birch bark, the purest and highest quality source.

Do you want to know how it works?

Discover our products available individually or in convenient kits, or contact me -I am here to help you. 🥰 Alternatively, you can fill out the‘Find Your Path‘ quiz, a tool that will help you become more aware of your cystitis.

I hug you tightly from here,

Lorenza

Read also: Treating cystitis with baking soda: a sensible choice or a bad idea?

In this article we talked about…

  • Not all patients with urinary tract infections (UTIs) experience burning or pain during urination, so it is also important to be aware of other common symptoms such as fever, foul-smelling urine, or fatigue.
  • Poor hygiene, wearing too tight underwear, and sexual intercourse are some of the most common causes and risk factors for the onset of cystitis.
  • For diagnosis of cystitis, urinalysis is the first test to be performed to check for blood particles, pus or bacteria, but there are also urine sticks that can give a preliminary indication.
  • Bacterial cystitis is treated primarily with antibiotics to stop the infection, but a longer course of antibiotics or a specialist visit to urology or nephrology may be recommended for recurrent infections.
  • A natural solution for women who do not wish to take antibiotics is D-mannose, a sugar that adheres to bacteria in the bladder and helps expel them naturally during urination.

FAQ on cystitis without burning

Can I have cystitis without experiencing burning?

In principle, yes. Many patients develop painless urinary tract infections (UTIs), although most men and women experience at least one other common symptom, such as fever, foul-smelling urine, or fatigue.

What are the common symptoms of a urinary tract infection?

Most people who suffer from a urinary tract infection, including cystitis, complain of at least some of the following symptoms: pain during urination, burning during urination, pelvic pain, feeling of a constant need to urinate, fever, chills, nausea or vomiting, fatigue, feeling of general malaise, cloudy urine, foul-smelling or strongly smelling urine.

How is bacterial cystitis treated?

Bacterial cystitis is treated mainly with antibiotics to stop the infection. If it is a first infection, symptoms may improve even in the first day of taking antibiotics. However, it is good for the patient to take antibiotics for three days to a week, depending on the severity of the symptoms. In fact, it is important that antibiotic treatment is completed according to the doses recommended by the specialist and that the infection is completely cleared.

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